Features

The petroleum industry uses mechanical pigs, like the one shown here, inside a pipeline. The pig, used to clean the inside pipeline wall, gets pushed along by the flow of oil or natural gas.
Fall 2017
A $7.9 million Genome Canada grant is funding research into the mitigation­ of widespread pipeline corrosion caused by bacteria. The project is estimated­ to save Canada’s oil and gas industry $300 to $500 million annually.

An oilfield worker from BP Exploration first noticed the acrid smell while driving near the...

 more than six billion tonnes of plastic waste end up in the ocean
Fall 2017
David Levin of the University of Manitoba is using bacteria to create renewable bioresins for making green biodegradable biocomposite materials for the transportation­ and aerospace industries.

Watch any New York City cop drama, from Law & Order to Blue Bloods, and you will see what filmmakers call an “establishing” shot.

Garlic
Fall 2017
To food scientists and chemists who research the medicinal­ and health effects of garlic, the “stinking­ rose” has never smelled so sweet.

Humanity’s use of essential oils goes back thousands of years, with natural agents such as frankincense playing...

Business, Aviation biofules
Summer 2017
Canada's Biojet Supply Chain Initiative is working to integrate jet fuel derived from renewable sources into airport-fuelling infrastructure used by commercial airliners around the globe.

In one of several town-hall meetings held across the country early this year, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau sparked controversy by pointing to the need for Canada...

Lords of the Ring
Summer 2017
Benzene’s hexagonal molecular configuration stops enzymes from grabbing hold and reacting easily, making this petroleum byproduct difficult­ to clean up. Chemical engineer­ Elizabeth Edwards­ of the University of Toronto is helping overcome this problem b

Was the structure of benzene really illuminated by a chemist’s dream of a snake devouring its own tail? Historians of science are skeptical of this persistent...

molecule
Summer 2017
Queen’s University’s David Zechel studies microbial­ enzymes­ that can break down the controversial herbicide­ glyphosate, also known as Roundup.

Is it possible for chemists to make the perfect molecule? David Zechel, associate professor at Queen’s University Department of Chemistry in Kingston, Ont., says...